Badanekai Gojji Sambar/ Brinjal Dal :

Our Native Brinjal has its charm and a fan base. People who like it relish it in many ways. I have already shared the palya, and this dal is one more item, which is our family favourite and mild at the taste. Here, we use either Gulla or a native variety of big green brinjal.

It needs hardly any ingredient but tastes fantastic and soothing in the summer heat. It is No coconut, vegan curry. 

Ingredients:

Brinjal – 1 ( big)

Toor dal – 1 cup ( cooked with turmeric and mashed)

Green chillies – 5 to 8 ( slit)

Salt – as per taste

Jaggery – as per taste

Roasted methi powder – ½ to 1 spoon

Tamarind – small lemon sized

coriander leaves – 2 tbl spoon (Chopped)

Seasoning: Coconut oil – 1 tbl spoon, Mustard – 1 tsp, Hing – peanut size ball, red chilli – 1, curry leaves – 1 spring.

Method:

-Here, we use full brinjal, even its stalk. So, the chopping procedure is, Halve the brinjal, even the stalk. Make four slits lengthwise. And dice it. Remove the inner woody part of the stalk and discard.

-Put those brinjal pieces in water and immerse.

-Now, take one vessel, Boil tamarind, 2 cups of water, salt, jaggery, slit green chillies. When it starts boiling, add brinjal pieces by draining the immersed water.

-When brinjal pieces turn soft, add mashed dal, roasted methi powder, adjust the salt and, jaggery and chillies according to your taste.

-Boil nicely, garnish with coriander. Do the seasoning by heating oil, splutter mustard, hing, red chilli and curry leaves.

-Enjoy with hot rice and papad.

NOTE: You can check the quantity of all the essential ingredients in the Above picture.

 

 

 

Mullu Sauthe Guliyappa / Cucumber Appe:

Like Kendathadya, this is one more recipe, which I love and cherish the fond memories of my childhood. This recipe is usually made with heirloom cucumber of our region, which is flavorful and watery compared to commercially available salad cucumber.

Ajji, my maternal grandma or my aunt used to prepare this dish for the evening snack. It used to be real fun, sitting in front of the wood fire, chatting with ajji, holding the plate full of two types of Guliyappa. One is the sweeter version with added jaggery, and the other is savoury, with added onion, chilli, and curry leaves. It is pure bliss, and we never recreate the moment of such a warm, comfortable atmosphere in today’s world.

Now, we would see the procedure of making Sweet and Savory version –

Ingredients:

Dosa rice – 1 + 1 cup

Cucumber – 1 Big

Fresh grated Coconut – ½ + ½ cup

Salt

Jaggery – ½ cup (grated)

Onion – 1 medium

Curry leaves

Green chilli

Method:

-Wash, Soak rice in two bowls separately for 3 to 4 hours. Drain soaked water before grinding. (We are using an oozed water out of cucumber for grinding rice)

-Make jaggery syrup by boiling grated jaggery with very little water, sieve the liquid to remove all the impurities.

-Take one big cucumber, peel the skin, make halves, remove the inner core and seeds and grate it. Mix salt to the gratings, leave aside for 5 minutes.

When cucumber oozes its water, strain it through a sieve by extracting all oozed water and collecting it for grinding rice.

-Now, grind the batter for a sweeter version, take one set of drained rice, add ½ cup of Coconut, jaggery syrup, required amount of cucumber water and grind into not so smooth batter.

-To this batter, add tightly packed one cup of cucumber gratings and whip the mixer grinder to mix it thoroughly with the batter.

-Remove this batter to one vessel and allow to rest for 2 to 3 hours. (Resting the batter would help to make Guliyappa softer and flavorful)

-Now, it is time to make batter for the Savory version. Grind the same as the sweet version without adding jaggery. After adding and mixing the cucumber gratings, add chopped onion, green chilli and curry leaves.

-Remove this batter to one vessel and allow to rest for 2 to 3 hours. (Resting the batter would help to make Guliyappa softer and flavorful)

-After the resting period, heat the Appe/ Paddu pan, pour little ghee into each mould. When the paddu pan is hot, pour the batter, cook in a low flame, turn around, cook both sides properly, and enjoy the flavourful and delicious Sweet and Savoury Cucumber Guliyappa.

 

Bilimbi Saaru /Tree Sorrel Rasam :

Bimbuli / Beempuli, anyone? Yes! It is our local name to Bilimbi 😀
Averrhoa bilimbi, commonly known as Bilimbi, “Cucumber tree”, “tree sorrel”, is a tiny, tangy, juicy fruit that regularly appears in Coastal Karnataka cuisine.

Bimbuli is what we call it, and it is also known as Tree sorrel. It is a common backyard tree, and you would find it in every house of the coastal region. The beauty of our traditional cuisine is impressive. When we take only Mangalore cuisine, we find at least 6 to 7 varieties of souring agents used for specific purposes according to the ingredient and the recipe. For example, Kokum, tamarind, Monkey jack (known as Unde Huli or Kethe Huli), Hog plum, Bilimbi (beempuli), Raw mango and the list goes on.

Before the lockdown, I found this in my locality during our evening walk and introduced it to my daughter.

We used to eat this watery fruit by dipping it in salt and asked her to eat it with salt. She, who is fond of any khatta/ souring agent, enjoyed and asked for more. Besides eating, I loved pickle, which my paternal aunt used to prepare and get it.

While talking, remembering good old memories, my mother in law mentioned Bimpuli saaru, which her mom-in-law used to prepare. As a curious learner, I started asking her about the recipe? How did she use to make etc.?

As always, she said, what is the recipe? There is nothing in that saru—a little bit of cooked dal, green chilli and hing.

The next day, I made the saru, which I never tasted before, and it was indeed flavourful and delicious and thought of documenting it in my blog for future reference.

 Ingredients:

Bilimbi /Tree sorrel – 6 to 7 or acc to your taste

Cooked toor dal – 1 small Katori

Salt

Jaggery – to taste

Green chillies – 6 to 8 (slit)

Hing – peanut size

Seasoning:

Coconut oil – 1 tbl sp

Mustard – 1 tsp

Red chilli -1

Curry leaves – 1 spring

Method:

-Take a one cooking pot, put Chopped tree sorrel, slit green chillies, salt, jaggery, hing, 2 cups of water as well as cooked, mashed dal.

-When chillies and sliced tree sorrels are cooked, adjust the consistency by adding water, if necessary, salt, jaggery or hing. Boil a couple of minutes more and add seasoning.

-To season, heat oil, splutter mustard, red chilli and curry leaves. Yes! It is so simple and tasty.

-This tasty saru is pairs well with hot rice and papad with any vegetable side dish to accompany.

 

Pomegranate Peel Tambli:

Like coconut tree and banana plant , pomegranate is also an extremely useful plant to mankind. Starting from its bark, young leaves , fruits, and its outer peel have many medicinal properties.

In olden days, people never used to buy a fruit from outside. In our villages, people used to eat home grown seasonal fruits , which included wildly grown many berries, guava, chikoo, mango , bell fruits etc. Banana bunch used to be hanged at one corner of the house and it was the only fruit which was available  365 days. Pomegranate was rare, if any person is ill or recuperating after surgery etc  then only, it used to enter our houses. So, lady of the house used to treat that not less than the gold 😉 . She used to make it a point to clean the peel by removing all those white covers, break it into 4 to 6 pieces, carefully sun drying and used to store it near “chulha” / we call it as a “ole katte” ( it is basically a olden day’s cooking platform, which used wood as fuel). Throwing out the peel was not heard of and it had an enormous importance in every family in our region.

According to my co sister, who is an ayurvedic doctor, Ayurveda holds Pomegranate fruit in higher regards because of its antioxidant, pro biotic nature. Due to its anti-bacterial and anti-microbial quality, it helps to bind the stools and helps to control the diarrhoea. She says, Astringent- bitter taste of the peel is the reason behind its anti-diarrhoea quality. Hence, it can be used to cure diarrhoea and not in constipation. Pomegranate peel powder is good for oily skin. If powder is mixed with rose water and applied as a face pack , it reduces acne and brings glow to oily face.

In traditional home remedies When fruit has been used to treat Anaemia , peel has been used to treat dysentery/ diarrhoea (even with blood) . We normally prepare Kashaya by boiling couple of pieces of dried peel in a cup of water, reduced to half and consumed either plain or by adding little jaggery. Otherwise, every now and then, prepare Tambli and consume to maintain our gut health .

Tambli is preferred to total wellbeing of our gut because , it is more palatable than the Kashaya, as well as it consists  curd ,which again is a pro-biotic. Hence, if we include pomegranate peel in our regular diet every now and then, it helps in intestinal detoxifying and cleansing. In return it would helps to improve digestion.

Now we would see how to dry those fruit peels at first: It is quite simple. Remove all the white sheath beneath the fruit kernels, dry under the sun or keep it near the windowsill . When it is crisp ,breaks while folding, that is it. Store it in an airtight jar or zip lock. Use whenever it is needed.

Tambli preparation:

Ingredients:

Dried Pomegranate peel – 2 pieces

Black whole pepper – 6 to 8

Cumin – ½ – ¾ tsp

Fresh grated Coconut – 1 fistful

Curd – 1 to 1 ½  small serving spoon

Salt

Ghee

Method:

-Fry pepper, cumin, broken pieces of the peel until it is  crispy.

-Grind these into fine paste by adding coconut ,salt and sufficient water.

-Add curd, adjust the consistency by adding water.

-If needed season with ghee, cumin and curry leaves and serve with rice or drink as it is.

NOTE:

1) For vegan version, instead of ghee or clarified butter one can use coconut oil .

2)You can use whole black pepper corns or white pepper corns.

 

 

 

 

Mango ginger Thokku:

Mango ginger! Yes, it is a rhizome, resemble more of a ginger and taste like Mango sans tanginess.

It is locally known as Mangannari /mavinakai shunti in Kannada and Aam Haldi in Hindi. Mango ginger is antioxidant ,anti fungal ,antibacterial as well as anti- inflammatory in nature.

In our native, it is widely used in our traditional cooking.  We normally make Chutney or Tambli and added with lemon in pickle. Never tried or eaten the Thokku version. My dear friend Smitha sent me her grand mom’s recipe and asked me to prepare and post it in my blog. Heirloom recipes are very dear to my heart and I am very lucky to get the recipe of soul satisfying ,  tasty as well as flavourful recipe of Mango ginger Thokku.

Ingredients:

Mango ginger – 200 – 250 grams (grated or ground to semi coarse texture)

Hing/ Asafoetida – A generous pinch (1/2 Teaspoon)

 Curry Leaves – A sprig or two

 Byadagi Red Chillies – 4 ( broken into pieces)

 Fenugreek/Methi seeds – 2 Teaspoons (Roasted and powdered)

Jaggery Powder – 2 to 3 Teaspoons

Oil – ¼ to ½ cup

Mustard Seeds – 2 Teaspoons

Red chilli powder – 1 to 2 tsp

 Salt – To taste

Turmeric Powder – 2 Teaspoons (You can use fresh grated turmeric too)

Method:

-After Washing, peel the mango ginger and you can opt for grinding into semi coarse texture or grating.

-Take one kadai, heat oil, splutter mustard, add hing, red chillies, curry leaves and fry.

-Add mango ginger sauté it well. Add salt, allow to cook.

-When half done, add the jaggery powder and proceed to cook in the low flame.

-When it is almost done, oil starts leaving on the sides ,mixture becomes like a mass.

-At this time, add turmeric, roasted methi powder, red chilli powder. Mix well and cook 2 to 3 minutes.

-Switch off the gas, allow to cool and store in clean glass jar.

-Stays well for months. If refrigerated, stays for a year. Just like any other Thokku. Voila! Enjoy with idli, dosa, Uppittu or steaming hot rice with a dollop of ghee or any preferred oil.

Note : If using fresh turmeric, add it along with the mango ginger, or halfway through.

Whether grinding or grating, the final texture will be like that of chutney… smooth. So, grind it to semi coarse texture, as grating can be tedious. If cooking on low heat, occasional stirring and tossing is enough.

Tip : You can grind two green chillies along with the mango ginger. That enhances the taste. In that case, you can reduce the chilli powder by half a teaspoon and one or two dried red  chillies in the tempering. Jaggery balances the taste and takes the taste to next level.

Some add tamarind. It changes the flavour and colour to brownish orange. But, if you like, you can either add tamarind powder or thick extract after a quick sauté of the mango ginger in the tempering.

Fresh Turmeric Gojju:

Turmeric is a  popular spice of Indian Cuisine and we normally use it in powder form almost in all the recipes. In this time of the year, we do use fresh root in our kitchen. The fragrance of the fresh raw turmeric is very different than the powder. If you haven’t tried fresh turmeric root yet, this recipe is a delicious and refreshing way to get a taste of its earthy, sweet flavour of fresh produce.

Our ancestors had a really nice way to taking care of their health . According to the season, and depending on the local produce, they used to make and consume all the goodness of the nature in a natural way.  This recipe is one of them and it is  one of the age-old recipes which I learnt from my atte .

How it is made-

Ingredients:

Fresh Turmeric rhizome – 2 pieces

Coconut – ½ cup

Coriander – 1 table sp

Urad dal – 1 tsp

White sesame seed – ½ tsp

Red chilli – 3

Tamarind – 1 tsp

Salt

Jaggery – 2 table sp

Coconut oil – 2 tablespoons

Method:

-Clean the turmeric rhizome, grate and keep it ready.

-To prepare masala: Fry coriander, urad dal, red chilli and sesame seed in little oil. Grind this with coconut, into smooth paste.

-Now take one tawa, pour oil, fry grated turmeric, add tamarind water, salt, jaggery and cook .

-When turmeric changes its colour, add ground masala. Check for the salt and jaggery.

-Boil this nicely, serve with Hot rice and ghee. It is indeed  pure bliss and oodles of goodness for your body.

 

 

Brahmi Tambli:

Centella Asiatica is commonly known as Centella /Gotu kola or Asiatic pennywort locally known as Thimare /Brahmi or Ondelaga in our region. Popularly known as a memory enhancer and from ages, it has been used as a brain tonic. In our coastal Brahmi is considered as a body coolant and used as a culinary herb during summer either by making chutney or Tambli.

Brahmi is a small runner/succulent herb and contains numerous fibrous roots at its every node. In our coastal belt, it grows widely in our paddy fields or Areca nut garden. It has small tiny seed-like flowers with a neutral colour. The whole plant including its roots can be used in cooking as well as medicinal purpose. It has little bitter sweetish taste when it is consumed in a raw form without any added taste enhancer. 2 teaspoons of Raw extract can be used for 3 to 7 days to enhance the overall health /to boost immune system/to reduce any inflammation of the body. Apart from this, it is very good for hair as well and I have shared the Hair oil recipe long ago by adding Brahmi and many other goodnesses. 

In our region, usually, we make Tambli or chutney and consumed as a raw form (not boiled) to get all the benefits of the greens. This particular recipe I learnt it from Kavya Bhat which she has shared with us in our Foodie Facebook group and I want to thank her for the wonderful tasty recipe.

How to make Tambli-

Ingredients:

Brahmi greens – 1 fistful (You can use with roots or without)

Coconut – ½ cup

Cumin – ½ tsp

Jaggery – 1 small piece

Curd – ½ cup

Salt

Seasoning:

Coconut oil – 1 tsp

Sesame seeds – 1tsp

Red chilli flakes – 1 tsp (or chopped red chilli)

Curry leaves – 1 spring

Method:

-Wash Brahmi greens and roots nicely.

-Put Brahmi, coconut, salt, cumin, jaggery and pour ½ cup of water and grind into a smooth paste.

-Sieve the content and extract the liquid.

-Take all the roughage, add curd and little water grind once again and sieve. Collect the liquid.

-Third time add little water and grind, sieve and extract the liquid and discard all the remaining roughage.

-Prepare seasoning- heat oil, add sesame, when it turns light brown switch off the gas. Add red chilli flakes, curry leaves and add to Tambli.

-Adjust the salt and enjoy either as an appetiser or with white or brown/ red rice.

 

 

Kadu Mavina hannina Hasi Gojji/ Wild Mango Gojju:

Wild mangoes are known as Kadu mavina hannu in our local language. Which is very fibrous, tangy as well as sweet in taste. It has distinct taste; it is widely used in varieties of curries in our region. Hasi Gojju is nothing but, raw form of curry. Which can be prepared in a jiffy and doesn’t need any heating and is a perfect treat for summer. Usually we enjoy this with hot rice as well as devoured like a dessert :D. In Mango season, we do prepare varieties of curries like Sasame or Sasive, saaru and Gojju are the most loved dishes of our region.

Ingredients:

Wild mangoes -5-6

Salt – to taste

Jaggery – to taste

Green chillies – 1 or 2

Seasoning: Coconut oil – 1 tsp, mustard – 1 tsp, Red chilli – 1, Curry leaves – little.

Method:

  • Wash wild mangoes, remove top part of the mango, remove outer skin and keep this in a separate vessel. Keep inner fruit part in another vessel.

  • Add one cup of water to outer skin, mash nicely, collect pulpy water and add this to fruit.
  • Discard outer remaining skin. Add required amount of jaggery, salt and crush green chillies by using your hand.
  • Mix everything, check for the seasoning. If needed add some more grated jaggery or salt.
  • Season by using coconut oil. When it is hot, add mustard, after it splutters, add red chilli and curry leaves, add this to mango curry.

  • Enjoy this with hot rice.

NOTE:

-If you don’t have access to wild mango, don’t worry. Pick up any (little sour) varieties of mango, peel the outer skin and chop the fruit into bite size pieces or mash a little and proceed with above method.

 

Malabar spinach and Raw papaya curry:

Malabar spinach is commonly known as Basale in our coastal area. It is a common creeping vein in the backyard of every household.

Its leaf is very rich in iron, fibre, antioxidants and vitamins and low in calorie. Malabar spinach is a go getter veggie at any given point of time. You can harvest, as soon as the main stem is growing and spreads all over. Snip the leaves and use the stems as well.

On the other hand, raw papaya is also a power house of nutrients and it is a natural cleanser of intestine and colon.

Like Malabar spinach, Papaya tree also plays an integral part in our garden. May be because of the easy availability, we have a couple of traditional dishes with Raw papaya and one curry is this. Our elders had so much knowledge to include all the goodness in their cooking. One such recipe is Raw papaya and Malabar spinach with a freshly ground coconut masala. It can be relished with Boiled rice or white rice. It is an overall package of health benefits from both the veggies.

Ingredients:

Malabar spinach – one small bundle

Raw papaya – 1 small

Onion – 1

Salt

Jaggery

Red chilli powder – 1 tsp

Toor dal – ½ cup

For Masala paste:

Coriander – 1-2 table spoon

Cumin – 1 tsp

Methi – ½ tsp

Dried red chillies – 5 to 6

Tamarind – 1 tsp

Coconut – 1 to 1 ½ cup

Seasoning:

Coconut oil – 1 table spoon

Mustard – 1 tsp

Red chilli – 1

Small onion – 1

Curry leaves – 1 spring

Method:

-Wash Malabar spinach leaves, chop and keep aside. If you are using its stem, cut it into 2 to 3-inch pieces.

-Chop Raw papaya by removing outer skin as well as inner seeds. Dump in a bowl of water to remove all the oozed latex and drain.

-Wash Toor dal, if you have chopped Malabar spinach stem, put it together and cook with dal by adding turmeric and salt.

-When toor dal is ready, remove the lid, add little water, additional salt, jaggery and red chilli powder, Papaya pieces and chopped leaves cook for one whistle.

-Now prepare masala by roasting methi, coriander, cumin and red chillies in little oil. Grind into paste by adding coconut, tamarind and water.

-Add the ground paste into cooked veggies, adjust everything, boil and add seasoning.

-To season, heat oil, splutter mustard, red chilli, curry leaves and chopped onion. When onion becomes brown add into the curry.

-Serve with Hot rice.

 

 

Bannangayi Dosey /tender (young) coconut Dosa:

When I was a little girl, my mom used to work, and I used to spend the summer vacation at my grandparents’ house. I used to enjoy at the farm house by having an unlimited supply of Mangoes, tender coconut, pineapples etc.

There used to be abundant supply of fallen young coconuts, also called ‘bannangayi’ which have much harder flesh than what we get in the normal tender coconut carts over.

My aunt used to make a very tasty Dosa out of this and we used to relish this along with chutney and Jaggery syrup topped with homemade ghee.

Yesterday, when we had tender coconuts here in Bangalore, inner pulp was very thick and couldn’t eat. So, I thought about Dosa and prepared this after ages. It was such a nostalgic moment for me. Let us see how to make this tasty Dosa.

Ingredients:

Tender coconut – 1

Dosa rice – 2 cups

Salt

Method:

-wash and soak Dosa rice for 3 to 4 hours.

-Grate or chop tender /young coconut and keep aside.        

            

-Grind soaked rice with grated young coconut by adding little water and salt and make smooth paste. This batter must be like our regular Dosa batter and there is no need of fermentation.                           

-You can make use of this batter straight away. Usually we prepare this batter in the morning itself.

-If you want to prepare this batter in the evening, to make the Dosa in the morning, you can store the batter in the refrigerator.

-To prepare Dosa, heat iron Dosa tawa. When it is hot, don’t apply any oil. You can pour one serving spoon of batter and make Dosa like our regular Dosa. Pour ½ tsp of ghee and Close the lid.     

             

When it shows little brownish spots here and there, flip the side, cook upper side and serve with Coconut and onion chutney , jaggery syrup which is topped with ghee or honey.